Thursday, March 25, 2010

Orthograph #69 - Annunciation and Abortion

10 comments:

matthewmoore said...

It's amazing how many protestant folks I know act like there was no church pre-16th century. Rome-o-phobia indeed, mixed with a healthy ignorance of history.

Gabe said...

"Today, the Son of God becomes the Son of the Virgin." This is one of my Favorite Feast days of the Church. :) It always makes me think of the abortion topic, and fills my heart with joy that "TODAY is the beginning of our salvation." You could almost write a hymn that says "Today a Virgin makes a choice, and remains virgin."

Anonymous said...

I have often wondered whether/how much the abandonment of the celebration of the Annunciation has led to the celebration of abortion in our modern world. It's all intermingled: incarnation, the image of God, the self-emptying of God and of the Theotokos, the giving of life through one for all.

--Patty Joanna

Josephus Flavius said...

And here I was writing up a post on the jumping in the womb of two babies as a response to baby-isn't-a-person-in-the-womb argument... may still do it. Now with an illustration.

s-p said...

Indeed, PJ. While it is above my pay grade to explicate it, I think this is a prime example of how, when we leave out part of the picture the consequences compound and grow. The post-Reformation left out Mary (for the most part) and Western philosophy redefined the existence of the human being according to "Christmas" (birth) rather than "Annunciation" (conception). That may be an extremely broad brush, but I think there is a connection. Theology defines the universe. A minute detail of theology ignored or gotten wrong has unimaginable, deep and eternal consequences.

CoderForChrist said...

s-p, I think that this may be part of why, when a Protestant asks an Orthodox Christian whether the Feasts are "necessary" for salvation, the Orthodox Christian may well respond with, "Yes, they are." Not because not observing them would, alone, cause us to fall into Hell, but rather because it is through the feasts and through the prayers in the services, that we learn theology.

On a similar note, I began to think, listening to the hymns, that if a Protestant were to listen to what is said in these hymns on this feast, he might begin to understand why we so honor the Theotokos.

Patricia said...

And this is precisely why several of us gather every year to pray outside the local IVF clinic on the Feast of the Annunciation -- that these preborn brothers & sisters of ours may not be forgotten as they die, are experimented on, or languish in frozen suspension behind the closed doors of fertility clinics. We carry with us an icon of the Annunciation.

Melanie said...

With love, kindness and prayers of mercy for the women who have made this choice.

Patricia said...

Love, kindness & mercy indeed. It is not a very welcome thing to take a stand against IVF & other assisted reproductive technologies. Few understand the spiritual & moral implications of such. Society long ago sought to commodify sexual reproduction & childbearing, & has been largely successful in doing so. Lord have mercy.

あじ said...

Ignoring Mary due to Romaphobia reminds me of prohibition. Except I have a much higher view of the Mother of God than beer (a lesser, yet true proof that God loves humanity). It also seems like a form of iconoclasm. God grant us to be generations who speak as Elizabeth did through the Spirit! Mary, blessed are you among women!