Thursday, August 19, 2010

On The Priesthood

The expanded podcast version of the post Work and Priesthood

Listen HERE

4 comments:

nothinghypothetical.com said...

We tell so many lies. It seems a hopeless task that we should ever find our way out from under them to know what the truth is and speak it.

David B said...

One of my profs here has said that we all come to seminary (and, really, I should think, engage in any venture) with mixed, impure motives. We should begin all things with acknowledgement of that and proceed from there (not, of course, assuming that this should necessarily stop us from going through with said venture, but simply going forward with the necessary admission of impurity).

Jason said...

Somewhat related: a growing trend of clergy getting burned out (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/02/nyregion/02burnout.html?_r=3&src=me&ref=homepage)

s-p said...

David, That is true that 99% of our good intentions are a mixture of ego and virtue. Sometimes we come to grips with our egos by engaging the venture and sometimes by failing at it. If we have a community willing to confront us and we are willing to listen we are light years ahead of the game. In the end it is not our ego that is death it is our unwillingness to admit we have one at work within us.

Jason, sometimes I'd like to see a psychological assessment of those who are "burning out". At least from my personal experience I was a "people pleaser", unable to set boundaries and my whole identity and existence was wrapped up in people's praise. Burnout is the endgame of dysfunctional relationships. People cannot consume you if you don't let them or want them to.